Dr. Oliver Meier

Dr. Oliver Meier


Research Division: International Security
Associate

oliver.meier(at)swp-berlin.org

2005 - 2013 Senior Researcher at the Institute for Peace Research and Security Policy at the University of Hamburg (IFSH) and International Correspondent and Representative of the Arms Control Association

2003 - 2005 Staffer in the office of Uta Zapf, Member of the German Bundestag

1999 - 2002 Senior Researcher at the Verification Research, Training and Information Centre (VERTIC), London

07/1996 - 07/1999 Senior Researcher at the Berlin Information Centre for Transatlantic Security (BITS)

Areas of Expertise:

Arms control, Weapons of mass destruction / proliferation

Problems related to the proliferation of weapons of mass destruction and on ways to control and reduce biological, chemical and nuclear weapons. Ways to cooperatively control military and risk technologies.


SWP-Papers (selection):

with Hanns Günther Hilpert

Charting a New Course on North Korea’s Nuclear Programme?

The Options and the Non-Proliferation Treaty

SWP Comments 2013/C 19, June 2013, 7 Pages

Publications (selection):

The Changing Shape of Arms Control: Background and Implications

in: Heinrich-Böll-Stiftung (ed.): The Future of Arms Control. Berlin, March 2014
with Simon Lunn

Trapped: NATO, Russia, and the Problem of Tactical Nuclear Weapons

in: Arms Control Today, January/February 2014

Technology Transfers and Non-Proliferation

Between control and cooperation

Routledge Global Security Studies, Routledge, New York et al. 2013, 280 pages

European efforts to solve the conflict over Iran's nuclear programme: How has the EU performed?

EU Non-Proliferation Consortium, Non-Proliferation Papers, No. 27, February 2013, 22 pages
with Christopher Daase

Arms control in the 21st century: Between coercion and cooperation

New York: Routledge 2012, 264 pages

In the press:

with Marcel Dickow, with Max Mutschler, with Michael Paul

The case for rethinking NATO missile defense plans

Because of uncertainties about future missile threats, a lack of support among U.S. allies, and financial risks, the allies would be well advised to reassess their plans before proceeding with the further implementation of NATO missile defense, Dickow, Meier, Mutschler and Paul say.

Point of View, November 2013

SWP Comments

Markus Kaim, Annette Weber
Central African Republic in Crisis

African Union Mission Needs United Nations Support


Michael Paul
NATO Goes East

NATO-Japan Cooperation and the “Pivot to Asia”


SWP Research Papers

Ekkehard Brose
When Germany Sends Troops Abroad

The case for a limited reform of the Parliamentary Participation Act


Tim L. Oliver
Europe without Britain

Assessing the Impact on the European Union of a British Withdrawal